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Nearly One in Five American Adults Who Have Had COVID-19 Still Have "Long COVID"

Source :

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/nchs_press_releases/2022/20220622.htm

New data from the Household Pulse Survey show that more than 40% of adults in the United States reported having COVID-19 in the past, and nearly one in five of those (19%) are currently still having symptoms of "long COVID." The data were collected from June 1-June 13 by the U.S.


For all U.S. adults, the new data show:

Overall, 1 in 13 adults in the U.S. (7.5%) have “long COVID” symptoms, defined as symptoms lasting three or more months after first contracting the virus, and that they didn’t have prior to their COVID-19 infection.
Older adults are less likely to have long COVID than younger adults. Nearly three times as many adults ages 50-59 currently have long COVID than those age 80 and older.
Women are more likely than men to currently have long COVID (9.4% vs. 5.5%).
Nearly 9% of Hispanic adults currently have long COVID, higher than non-Hispanic White (7.5%) and Black (6.8%) adults, and over twice the percentage of non-Hispanic Asian adults (3.7%).
Bisexual adults and transgender adults (7.5%) were more likely to have current long COVID symptoms than adults of other sexual orientations and gender identities. 12% of bisexual adults have current long COVID symptoms, compared to 7% of straight and gay and lesbian adults. An estimated 15% of transgender adults have current long COVID symptoms, compared to 5% of cis-gender male adults and 9% of cis-gender female adults.
The prevalence of current long COVID symptoms differed between states. The states with the highest percentage of adults who currently have long COVID symptoms were Kentucky (12.7%), Alabama (12.1%), and Tennessee and South Dakota (11.6%). The states with the lowest percentage of adults who currently have long COVID symptoms were Hawaii (4.5%), Maryland (4.7%) and Virginia (5.1%).