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Use of once-weekly semaglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes in routine clinical practice: Results from the SURE Canada multicentre, prospective, observational study - PubMed

Use of once-weekly semaglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes in routine clinical practice: Results from the SURE Canada multicentre, prospective, observational study - PubMed

Source :

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34142429/

doi: 10.1111/dom.14468. Online ahead of print. 1 McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 2 Novo Nordisk A/S, Søborg, Denmark. 3 Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. 4 Novo Nordisk Canada Inc., Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. 5 Lotus Health Clinic, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

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    Key Points
    • Conclusion/Relevance: “In SURE Canada, patients treated with OW [once-weekly] semaglutide in routine clinical practice experienced clinically significant improvements in HbA1c, BW [body weight] and other outcomes, supporting semaglutide use in routine clinical practice …. Patients treated with OW semaglutide during this study experienced clinically significant reductions in HbA1c, BW and waist circumference and an improvement in PROs [patient-reported outcomes[.”
    • The SURE Canada study was a multicenter, prospective, observational study involving 356 T2D patients who completed treatment with once-weekly semglutide. Patients had one or more documented HbA1c values during the 12 weeks before semaglutide initiation, with the primary outcome being change in HbA1c during the nearly 30-week study.
    • In the study, the dose of OW semaglutide was not maximized possibly due to patients reaching their target HbA1c, the presence of adverse events, or “clinical inertia.”
    • In the study, the average number of antihyperglycemic medications in the sample was 2.9 at baseline and 3.6 at the end of the study.
    • “Overall, the SURE data had some unique features that are not seen in RCTs: included patients were taking different antihyperglycaemic medications and had a wide range of baseline characteristics, including those with a baseline HbA1c of less than 7%; the population included patients who switched from another GLP-1RA to semaglutide; patients had a longer diabetes duration compared with RCTs in general,” the authors wrote.
    • The recapitulation of real-world monitoring in T2D patients was a strength of the study. Patients were more diverse than those in most randomized controlled trials. Limitations include the presence of confounding variables due to the observational design, with biomarkers measured during routine clinical practice and not at mandatory or prespecified time points. Furthermore, the study did not have a comparator arm.